West African Building Material Found Along Georgia Coast (#235)


For hundreds of generations, Native Americans along the South Atlantic coast lived on the bounties of the sea.  Some of their seafoods were oysters, coquina, scallops and whelks.  They left behind enormous piles of these shells known as middens all up and down the coastline.

West Africans first coming to this country made use of the shells to make a building cement consisting of lime (made from burning the shells), sand, shells and water.  The material was called Tabby.

Slave cabins called Tabbies still exist on Ossabaw Island, off the coast of Savannah, Georgia.  Used as homes for many years by slave workers who lived and thrived there, the Tabbies held up against the gale force winds and rains of many a tropical storm and hurricane.

In St. Marys, Georgia the Tabby Ruins of a Sugar Works Plantation show the steadfast endurance of this unique indigenous building material.

Sugar Works Tabby Building Ruins

Sugar Works Tabby Building Ruins

Close Up Of Shells in the Tabby

Close Up Of Shells in the Tabby

The Bounty Of The Sea Recycled

The Bounty Of The Sea Recycled

Durable Tabby Walls Still Standing

Many Cultures Are Hidden In These Ruins

Sentinels to West African Heritage

Sentinels of West African Heritage

Tabby Ruins

Tabby Ruins, St. Marys, Georgia

Love,  Annie

Explore the rich heritage of our country.  You'll always be in wonder.

Explore the rich heritage of our country. You’ll always be in wonder.

About TinCanTraveler

Born under a wand'rin' star.... living in my Winnebago, traveling the country, explorer/adventurer, photographer, writer, chi master, massage therapist, retired teacher/counselor, work camper. Grateful for the freedom to do it all. Enjoying life's ultimate lessons of trust, respect, and grace. Inhale love; exhale gratitude.
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10 Responses to West African Building Material Found Along Georgia Coast (#235)

  1. rosebud1 says:

    Wonderful, wonderful information and stunning photography. Thank you dear teacher.

    • I so enjoy exploring, discovering, photographing and passing on all these wonderful bits that weave us all together down through the ages. Blessings for such a wonderful compliment.

  2. Sunshine says:

    wow. amazing! that is a lot of seafood eaten!! so nice to know how things get recycled into useful things. well done, Annie. ❤

  3. Sher says:

    Great pictures and great information. You are such a wealth of knowledge. What ever did I do without you. Lots of love to you Anne. Miss you,

  4. Patti Kuche says:

    Fabulous shots Annie and so fascinating to learn about the Tabby Houses. Love touring the country with you!

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